Artists Reshape Forest Spaces during 2021 ART RAMBLE “Something in the Air”

Curated by Laurie Bogdan and Kimberley HardingHapgood Wright Town Forest in Concord, MA, September 1 – November 14.

The Umbrella site 2021 Art Ramble: “Something in the Air” lists the sixteen artists’ bios, websites, and statements about their artwork, as well as audio versions to access as you move along.

I visited in September and October, followed by posts, each focusing on four installations. This third post connects four more through their relation to the forest’s trees, shadows, and light while always aware of the air.

 Listed above my photos of each installation are the artists’ names, materials used, and a brief quote from the artists’ statements about the art.

Liz Helfer – Foggy Morning  (Steel, chicken wire, nylon mesh, construction barrier)

http://www.elizabethhelfer.com/

“Foggy Morning connects the idea of rest, peace, and environmental innovation. As the planet heats up, new technologies have become increasingly important to human survival. One of these technologies pulls water directly from the air, a “fog net” that maximizes water collection from the morning dew. Foggy Morning is a pseudo fog net shaped like a large worn pillow. The pillow has many mesh layers that reveal the smaller layers within, a reflection of the complex and intersecting issues at work due to increased water scarcity. “

 Melissa Shaak – Forest Air (Acrylic cutouts on steel stands)

www.melissashaak.net

“My artmaking process is full of creative sparks and enigmatic turns, as if there were indeed “something in the air.” This is particularly true for my installation “Forest Air,” in which seven life-size cutout figures stand in a large circle. They are an ensemble, and they’ve been on a fantastic journey together—going from two dimensions to three, from paintings into space and time, and now amidst the towering trees in the cool, fall forest air.”

Silvina Mizrahi – Every breath you take (Welded scraped steel and paint)

https://www.silvinamizrahi.com/

We need oxygen from trees to survive; without forests humanity ceases to exist. Using the fired cut technique and welding on scraped steel, I created a group of figures that represent humanity and their environment. The negative spaces on the sculpture invite the forest behind to be an active and essential part of the whole sculpture, symbolizing our intrinsic relation as humans with nature.

Rebecca McGee Tuck – Airing out the House (Steel, wire, crowdsourced plastic bags, VCR tape)

https://www.rebeccamcgeetuck.com/

I had the idea for this sculpture from something my mother used to say. After a long winter there inevitably would be a spring cleanup of our childhood home — closets cleaned, floors scrubbed, school and work papers organized and thinned out. Part of this ritual was to open up all of the windows in the house on the first nice day, to flush out the stale air of the closed up winter. Airing out the house felt like turning the page on the short and dark days in order to make way for the fresh bright start of spring. 

2021 Art Ramble Artists and Art: Paul Angiolillo – Breathing (9) Laurie Bogdan and Kimberley Harding – Ethereal Dreamer (7) |  BARD (Barbara Ayala Rugg Diehl) – In and Out (2) |  Johanna Finnegan-Topitzer – Air Currents (3) |  Jennifer Fuchel – Up in the Air (8) |  Jude Griffin – The Luna Moth Life Cycle (5) |  Liz Helfer – Foggy Morning (15) Martha Heller – The Shutter Dresses (4) Janet Kawada – Collected Breath (13)| Silvina Mizrahi – Every breath you take (12)  Nilou Moochhala – The In-Between Series (10) |  Lisa R. Nelson – Waves of the Aerial Sea (6) |  Melissa Shaak – Forest Air (11) |  Rebecca McGee Tuck – Airing out the House (14) | Kiyomi Yatsuhashi – Windblown (1) | ( bold text for art shown in this post)  

“In keeping with this year’s thematic focus on “Air,” the 2021 Art Ramble “Something in the Air” Call for Art recognizes that Air is invisible and yet essential to life. Its quality affects our quality of life, as well as that of all living things. Our call seek works that illustrate human, animal and botanical interactions with air, and encourage exploration of the atmospheric aspects of the Hapgood Wright Town Forest.”(2021 ART RAMBLE)

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