Category political issues

See Six Sculptures by Melvin Edwards in Different Seasons at deCordova before they Leave this Spring!!

The deCordova Sculpture Park is a great place to take in several selected works by one artist, especially Melvin Edwards! You can get close to all sides of each artwork and recognize connections to related sculptures within your view. Circle them on snowshoes or other ways this winter; stroll among them in the spring. Feeling lucky to live so near, I’ll pass along related links, quotes, and photos now.

Meet “The Embrace” Sculpture by Hank Willis Thomas on Boston Common, January 2023

On the cold rainy morning after the very crowded unveiling ceremony of January 13, 2023, I began to explore “The Embrace” on the Boston Common’s new ‘1965 Freedom Plaza.’ Here are a few photos, links, and quotes selected for this first in what could become a series of related posts in the years ahead. The focus of this post is the sculpture itself, with basic information about the Freedom Plaza and broader plans from Embrace Boston.

See Many Sides of Murals by Adam O’Day, Julia Roth and Cedric Douglas in Kendall Square

In December I happened upon two murals (painted 2019, 2020) on vent shafts for BioMed underground parking in the Canal District, Cambridge. Both extended my fascination with how artists can work creatively to include all sides and various functional features in their mural designs. The photos, links and quotes here should help reveal what artists did to transform vent shafts into colorful, exciting works of art!

Continue with 2022 ART RAMBLE, “In the Balance,” Focus on Three More Artists: Paul Angiolillo, Carolyn Enz Hack, Jose Trejo-Maya

This third post completes the series of related posts for 2022 ART RAMBLE, “In the Balance,” with photos, quotes, and links for three more of the eleven artists* (four more of the seventeen installations*). The first post includes an overview. All three note the curator talk on October 16 and other valuable resources. Whether I post again before the final day, November 19, I intend to revisit and reflect on significant connections between the forest and the artworks!

Take in Bike Tour of Public Art in Cambridge: Central Square, Cambridgeport, and Riverside

This post notes outstanding outcomes of an exciting event one perfect evening in late July 2022: the beautifully organized free bike tour of Cambridge public art between Central Square and the Charles River. 1. Bike-riders of all ages gathered outside the Central Square Library for an overview of art around the library and along the planned route of the whole tour. Cambridge police and attentive volunteers guided everyone safely through the sunset finale. 2. The tour is now engagingly documented in a 2-minute video. 3. The route has become a self-guiding tour for cyclists, though certainly adaptable to walkers. Facts, links and videos on the tour site are informative and intriguing for interested readers far from Cambridge. 4. The whole experience even elevated my already towering enthusiasm for public art!

Bottle Trees on Brattle Street Bring Histories to Light: “Forgotten Souls of Tory Row”

Several times this summer I have viewed and visited the bottle trees on the History Cambridge lawn. I hope to keep revisiting till they’re gone, April 2023. For now, I’ll share photos, quotes, and links that help me appreciate, understand, and reflect on an enlightening project, “Forgotten Souls of Tory Row: Remembering the Enslaved People of Brattle Street.”

Join in June Tribute to “Persistence” in Arlington through Photos from a Week of Changes

In early June I saw the following notice in Arts Arlington: “OWN A PIECE OF PUBLIC ART HISTORY! ‘Persistence’ Exhibit & Sale at Arlington Porchfest Join us during Porchfest (June 18, 1 to 4 pm) to get a close look at Michelle Lougee’s whimsical creations for the Minuteman Bikeway during an exhibition and sale of the sculptural pieces that make up PERSISTENCE. “( quote from Arts Arlington newsletter June 2022) The notice inspired my photo spree 1) along the bikeway while the sculptures were still up, 2) in the outdoor exhibit where they were finally touchable, 3) among the bikeway trees persisting after their departure. This post is my journal from each of the three phases, with photos, notes, quotes, and promising links.

ART SCRIM Extends Possibilities for Public Art Outdoors, as shown by Yenny Hernandez, Anna Dugan and Deborah Johnson

Each of these three artists has created several fabric panels that transform stretches of metal construction fencing near the intersection of Harvard Street and Western Avenue in Allston. One, Anna Dugan, incorporated concrete Jersey barriers as well. All three worked out their own distinctive series of panels printed on scrim, a lightweight durable translucent textile that has long been used in theater sets. Daylight, street light, clouds, the sky itself, and any machinery or equipment behind the fence can add variables to our view. Whether driving by or standing near, we respond to these shifting features. I grew more aware of such changes as I photographed the art. In fact, I felt that each artist had recognized and successfully addressed the possibilities of scrim.

Events in Ukraine Add to Art in Harvard Square

These photos, notes, and links are my attempts to connect recent and past events in outdoor art. These may help me transition to some future post with my own thoughts.

Light Poles Display Banners for Black History Month On Massachusetts Avenue in Arlington

This February (2022) I learned to look up at light poles for Black History Month banners along Massachusetts Avenue in Arlington. Luckily banners from earlier Februaries (2020 and 2021) were up again, along with a new set. Different artists, selected by Arlington Human Rights Commission and Arlington Commission for Arts and Culture, created the banners for each year.