Category steel

Harvard Business School Features Sculptures by Three Black Artists: Yinka Shonibare, Melvin Edwards, and Thaddeus Mosley 

As May begins, I want to share my photos, notes, and links for these three artists while their sculptures are still on campus (for the 2021-22 academic year).

We Become Aware of Active Air through 2021 Art Ramble in Hapgood Wright Town Forest

Based on September and October visits to 2021 Art Ramble, I add this fourth post, which features installations by BARD, Martha Heller, and Kiyomi Yatsuhashi. As in the three earlier posts, artist names, installation title, materials and quotes from the artists’ statements about their installations appear above my photos. Quotes and links are from The Umbrella Arts & Environment Website headed 2021 Art Ramble: Something in the Air. 

Jaume Plensa’s Sculptures Make Many Meaningful Connections

Jaume Plensa’s Humming came to deCordova Sculpture Park almost ten years ago, generating innumerable reminders of how powerful sculpture can be. As a guide at the park, Humming has given me reliable ways to connect with others about how and why a tall translucent entrancing head might come to be. Humming has brought perspective to other art in the park, and it has led me to more sculpture by the same artist as well.

Metal Preserves and Transforms Features of Trees in Art by Ed Shay and Letha Wilson

Ed Shay’s ten-foot-tall bronze “Acadian Gyro” entered deCordova Sculpture park about three decades ago. Letha Wilson’s nearly as tall cor-ten steel sculpture “Hawaii California Steel(Figure/Ground)” came in about two years ago. Until now I hadn’t  considered their common key elements: 1) attention to the forms of leaves and branches, 2) expressive rendering of those forms in durable metals ( bronze and steel) 3)relation to the seasonally changing foliage of nearby trees. My awareness grew from posting about four more obviously tree-related artworks in the park and noting further connections. Though I have been a volunteer guide in the park for almost two decades, this focus led me deeper into resources with heightened reasons to share them.

Titles of Sculptures Signal Ways to See Them: Falling Man by Douglas Kornfeld, Resurgence by David Kasman

Two sculptures near my house meant more than ever to me on January 20, 2021, with the inauguration of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris. Maybe just the images are enough to explain my emotions, but I might find words, or you might add them, to affirm how directions make a difference at critical moments. Meanwhile here are some photos and facts.