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Revisit 2022 ART RAMBLE, “IN THE BALANCE,” through November 19!

The first post about Art Rambe 2022 gives a brief overview, plus photos and notes about work by five of the eleven artists. This second post follows with focus on three other artists. A third post, coming soon, should include installations by three more. Each artist’s website should take you to additional views of their installations and more comprehensive information about their creative work. Whether or not I post beyond those, Art Ramble 2022 is sure to yield new discoveries as autumn advances.

Visit 2022 ART RAMBLE “In the Balance” for Connections and Perspective

My first visit to Art Ramble 2022 was the rewarding Walkabout and Artist Reception on Saturday, September 17. Engaged, enlightened and excited by presentations from several artists and curator Stephanie Marlin-Curiel, I wanted to share their stories as soon as possible. Yet I was short on time to take, process, select and organize photos that justly represent the art. This post mostly gives the overview, with quotes, notes, and links that should entice you to visit soon or otherwise explore online. Meanwhile I’ll plan on further opportunities to visit and focus on additional artworks in October. This post includes art by five of the eleven artists : David Ardito, BARD, Laurie Bogdan, Robert Greene, Rebecca McGee Tuck

Take Part in Public Art at Universal Design Playground, Danehy Park, Cambridge

With great enthusiasm, I share my recent discoveries of three public art projects within the relatively new Louis A. DePasquale Universal Design Playground: 1. Mitch Ryerson’s “Sensory Hilltop,” 2. NuVu Studio’s “Pipe Dreams,” 3. Dominic Killiany’s paintings. Here I simply build on background in earlier ART Outdoors posts about Mitch Ryerson’s playground design, but the other two were new to me: Nu Vu Studios, the Innovation School in Central Square Cambridge, and Dominic Killiany, an artist with autism. I hope the photos, quotes, and links add to your own explorations.

Bottle Trees on Brattle Street Bring Histories to Light: “Forgotten Souls of Tory Row”

Several times this summer I have viewed and visited the bottle trees on the History Cambridge lawn. I hope to keep revisiting till they’re gone, April 2023. For now, I’ll share photos, quotes, and links that help me appreciate, understand, and reflect on an enlightening project, “Forgotten Souls of Tory Row: Remembering the Enslaved People of Brattle Street.”