Category art and science study

Join in June Tribute to “Persistence” in Arlington through Photos from a Week of Changes

In early June I saw the following notice in Arts Arlington: “OWN A PIECE OF PUBLIC ART HISTORY! ‘Persistence’ Exhibit & Sale at Arlington Porchfest Join us during Porchfest (June 18, 1 to 4 pm) to get a close look at Michelle Lougee’s whimsical creations for the Minuteman Bikeway during an exhibition and sale of the sculptural pieces that make up PERSISTENCE. “( quote from Arts Arlington newsletter June 2022) The notice inspired my photo spree 1) along the bikeway while the sculptures were still up, 2) in the outdoor exhibit where they were finally touchable, 3) among the bikeway trees persisting after their departure. This post is my journal from each of the three phases, with photos, notes, quotes, and promising links.

Sophy Tuttle’s Murals Bring Buildings Brilliantly to Life: INTERCONNECTED and PROTECTING NATIVE PLANTS & POLLINATORS

Here are photos, quotes and links for two different but related murals: INTERCONNECTED on Western Avenue in Allston and PROTECTING NATIVE PLANTS & POLLINATORS on Massachusetts Avenue in Arlington.

Visit 2021 ART RAMBLE: “SOMETHING IN THE AIR” for Vital Stories and Vibrant Views

In September, after my first visit, I posted an overview with focus on four artworks and a plan to return for additional explorations. Now, selecting from photos in my second visit, early October, I focus in this sequel post on artworks about animals with wings.

Breathe in Energy of 2021 Art Ramble: “Something in the Air”

My first visit this year, on a sunny September morning, should be one of many in the next two months, so I won’t try to cram in whatever can wait for future posts. That suits the spirit I sensed along the pathways of this year’s ramble, allowing time and space between, and within each installation to appreciate what the air is offering. So here are just a few photos (with excerpts from artist statements) from four of the fifteen installations as samples of what you might see if you can go or explore online if you live elsewhere.

Temporary Art Leads to Ongoing Information from Harvard Museums of Science and Culture: PLAZA PAINT PROJECT

The person I saw painting attractive images on Science Center Plaza said she was not an artist, but she was creating interactive art to engage people with rich resources from the Harvard Museums of Science and Culture while the physical doors are still closed to visitors. She noted that the paintings on the plaza would be power-washed away in a few weeks. So once again I’ll post quickly to speed the news about temporary art  before it goes.

Art Grows from Trees: Alan Sonfist and Richard Rosenblum at deCordova

Sonfist’s The Endangered Species of New England has been part of the Sculpture Park since 2013. Rosenblum’s Venusvine, created 1990, has been there since 1996. Both artworks reflect their artists’ deeply rooted work with trees. Both are metal renderings of natural forms. Both artworks have decisive locations in the park. They’ve held their ground while other artworks have moved around, left or entered in recent years.

Panels from Significant Summer 2020 Extend Mystic River Mural and Affirm Hopes

In my July post about the Mystic River Mural Project, I was hopeful but not sure that the Summer 2020 project would work through all the complications of the pandemic. Now I can gladly share glimpses of the inspiring outcome with photos of the 2020 panels added this fall on Mystic Avenue. For context, read quotes with links to informative sources. Also note a new video that adds an enriching overview of the whole project.

Chris Frost Builds Two New Birdhouses for the Bikeway in Arlington before Taking Colony Down

After more than two years of winning devoted fans and welcoming many special guests, “Colony” created by Christopher and Basil Frost is due to depart before October ends. When I visited for an emotional last look, I was glad to find that two new birdhouses nearby were ready for first looks, both full of their own appeal and promise.

Applaud Playground Turtles and their Creators: Nancy Schön and Lilli Ann Killen Rosenberg

Endurance is a quality shared by the turtle sculptures in this post. Lilli Ann Roseberg’s colorful concrete turtles in Cambridge have been ridden, jumped on, snowed in, flooded over and lots more in the past three decades. Nancy Schön’s bronze Myrtle the Turtle was bound up and relocated within Boston’s Myrtle Street Playground soon after settling in last year. These sculptures endured isolation while playgrounds were closed in the spring and then cautiously reopened.

Mystic River Mural Panels from Last Summer Make Powerful Connections

Photos, quotes, and links related to the Mystic River Mural Project focus on the most recent additions, affirming the project’s persistent powers.