Category technology

Visit 2022 ART RAMBLE “In the Balance” for Connections and Perspective

My first visit to Art Ramble 2022 was the rewarding Walkabout and Artist Reception on Saturday, September 17. Engaged, enlightened and excited by presentations from several artists and curator Stephanie Marlin-Curiel, I wanted to share their stories as soon as possible. Yet I was short on time to take, process, select and organize photos that justly represent the art. This post mostly gives the overview, with quotes, notes, and links that should entice you to visit soon or otherwise explore online. Meanwhile I’ll plan on further opportunities to visit and focus on additional artworks in October. This post includes art by five of the eleven artists : David Ardito, BARD, Laurie Bogdan, Robert Greene, Rebecca McGee Tuck

Take Part in Public Art at Universal Design Playground, Danehy Park, Cambridge

With great enthusiasm, I share my recent discoveries of three public art projects within the relatively new Louis A. DePasquale Universal Design Playground: 1. Mitch Ryerson’s “Sensory Hilltop,” 2. NuVu Studio’s “Pipe Dreams,” 3. Dominic Killiany’s paintings. Here I simply build on background in earlier ART Outdoors posts about Mitch Ryerson’s playground design, but the other two were new to me: Nu Vu Studios, the Innovation School in Central Square Cambridge, and Dominic Killiany, an artist with autism. I hope the photos, quotes, and links add to your own explorations.

Public Art in Somerville Highlights History of deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum in Lincoln

Public art in Somerville has enlightened me in many ways in recent years. Here are two more examples, each enlivening my resources as a long-time volunteer guide at deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum in Lincoln. Both focus on fascinating aspects of Somerville’s Union Glass Company, owned by Julian deCordova through the early years of the twentieth century. One is among the seven vibrant panels of the Union Square History Murals on the building where Webster Avenue (55-50) and Prospect Street (70) intersect. The other is a bright sturdy signpost, among more than fifty others in Conway Park on Somerville Avenue. Here are photos, quotes, and notes to elaborate their connections.

Breathe in Energy of 2021 Art Ramble: “Something in the Air”

My first visit this year, on a sunny September morning, should be one of many in the next two months, so I won’t try to cram in whatever can wait for future posts. That suits the spirit I sensed along the pathways of this year’s ramble, allowing time and space between, and within each installation to appreciate what the air is offering. So here are just a few photos (with excerpts from artist statements) from four of the fifteen installations as samples of what you might see if you can go or explore online if you live elsewhere.

Temporary Art Leads to Ongoing Information from Harvard Museums of Science and Culture: PLAZA PAINT PROJECT

The person I saw painting attractive images on Science Center Plaza said she was not an artist, but she was creating interactive art to engage people with rich resources from the Harvard Museums of Science and Culture while the physical doors are still closed to visitors. She noted that the paintings on the plaza would be power-washed away in a few weeks. So once again I’ll post quickly to speed the news about temporary art  before it goes.

Metal Preserves and Transforms Features of Trees in Art by Ed Shay and Letha Wilson

Ed Shay’s ten-foot-tall bronze “Acadian Gyro” entered deCordova Sculpture park about three decades ago. Letha Wilson’s nearly as tall cor-ten steel sculpture “Hawaii California Steel(Figure/Ground)” came in about two years ago. Until now I hadn’t  considered their common key elements: 1) attention to the forms of leaves and branches, 2) expressive rendering of those forms in durable metals ( bronze and steel) 3)relation to the seasonally changing foliage of nearby trees. My awareness grew from posting about four more obviously tree-related artworks in the park and noting further connections. Though I have been a volunteer guide in the park for almost two decades, this focus led me deeper into resources with heightened reasons to share them.

Chris Frost Builds Two New Birdhouses for the Bikeway in Arlington before Taking Colony Down

After more than two years of winning devoted fans and welcoming many special guests, “Colony” created by Christopher and Basil Frost is due to depart before October ends. When I visited for an emotional last look, I was glad to find that two new birdhouses nearby were ready for first looks, both full of their own appeal and promise.

Colorful Characters Brighten Brine Tanks: Mural by Monique Aimee in Cambridge

Selected and funded by Percent-for-Art program in Cambridge, Monique Aimee proposed, planned, and painted her mural on all sides of the four tall brine tanks along the lot for Saint Peter’s Field. She began near the end of June and finished near the end of August. My photos here come from a few visits there throughout the summer. The links should take you to videos and exciting photos of the work in progress on Monique Aimee’s Instagram site: https://www.instagram.com/moniqueaimee/ The quotes here should give background that lets you visit in person or online.

David Judelson’s Brickworker and Ballplayer Keep on Documenting History

By  a ballfield  in North Cambridge ( Rindge Field) since 1983, two brick beings by David Judelson have faced each other supported by pertinent names, equipment, and stories. In recent years I had visited them with vague plans to post about them, though waiting for a way to focus. Then this spring when walks with face coverings became one of  the few recreational options, I discovered that Brickworker and Ballplayer had been outfitted in response to the pandemic.

Animal Sculptures Greet Us along the Somerville Community Path

None of the animal sculptures in this post are very new to the Somerville Community Path, and I have visited them all before. Mainly I delayed posting about them because I wanted to learn more about each one. So far my usual online research has not led to informative links I’d like to share.

This week though, with playgrounds closed and other outdoor options limited, the bike paths beckon people of all ages. Along the path, intriguing artworks await our attention and give pleasure by their presence. Maybe this post will lead to answers from people who made these animals or know the stories of their creation.