Category collaborative art projects

Changing Art Joins Constant Sculpture in Brattle Square: Ann Norton’s “Gateway to Knowledge” Stands with Beings Created by Minimum Wage Art

Tracking the relocations of “Skraelings” created by Minimum Wage Art (Bob Smith) led me to learn about Ann Norton’s long-standing brick monument in Brattle Square. Links and quotes offer background and perspective.

Newest Mystic River Mural Panels Feature Poem by Terry Carter and Actions by Green Roots

Panels from the summer Mystic River Mural Project are now installed on Mystic Avenue. Here are iPhone photos from my visit plus quotes with links to rewarding resources.

Look Back at Daniel Gordon’s Dewey Square Mural on the Greenway 2021

Though I visited and photographed Daniel Gordon’s art on the Greenway in 2021, I didn’t get to post about it. I kept meaning to go back for better photos and then the art was gone. But there are better photos and valuable perspectives in the Key Resources from Wonderland, WBUR, and Daniel Gordon’s own website, all quoted and listed here. Also now I want to document the transformations created by all nine Dewey Square murals in the past ten years.

Gold Brings Glow to “Breathe Life Together” Mural in Dewey Square on the Greenway

This post is a brief follow-up to the earlier one with images and quotes about the mural in progress during June 2022, crammed with quotes and links. The focus here is on how and why Rob “Problak” Gibbs incorporated gold and purple within the mostly black, gray, and white range of the main images.

Revisit 2022 ART RAMBLE, “IN THE BALANCE,” through November 19!

The first post about Art Rambe 2022 gives a brief overview, plus photos and notes about work by five of the eleven artists. This second post follows with focus on three other artists. A third post, coming soon, should include installations by three more. Each artist’s website should take you to additional views of their installations and more comprehensive information about their creative work. Whether or not I post beyond those, Art Ramble 2022 is sure to yield new discoveries as autumn advances.

Visit 2022 ART RAMBLE “In the Balance” for Connections and Perspective

My first visit to Art Ramble 2022 was the rewarding Walkabout and Artist Reception on Saturday, September 17. Engaged, enlightened and excited by presentations from several artists and curator Stephanie Marlin-Curiel, I wanted to share their stories as soon as possible. Yet I was short on time to take, process, select and organize photos that justly represent the art. This post mostly gives the overview, with quotes, notes, and links that should entice you to visit soon or otherwise explore online. Meanwhile I’ll plan on further opportunities to visit and focus on additional artworks in October. This post includes art by five of the eleven artists : David Ardito, BARD, Laurie Bogdan, Robert Greene, Rebecca McGee Tuck

Take Part in Public Art at Universal Design Playground, Danehy Park, Cambridge

With great enthusiasm, I share my recent discoveries of three public art projects within the relatively new Louis A. DePasquale Universal Design Playground: 1. Mitch Ryerson’s “Sensory Hilltop,” 2. NuVu Studio’s “Pipe Dreams,” 3. Dominic Killiany’s paintings. Here I simply build on background in earlier ART Outdoors posts about Mitch Ryerson’s playground design, but the other two were new to me: Nu Vu Studios, the Innovation School in Central Square Cambridge, and Dominic Killiany, an artist with autism. I hope the photos, quotes, and links add to your own explorations.

Bottle Trees on Brattle Street Bring Histories to Light: “Forgotten Souls of Tory Row”

Several times this summer I have viewed and visited the bottle trees on the History Cambridge lawn. I hope to keep revisiting till they’re gone, April 2023. For now, I’ll share photos, quotes, and links that help me appreciate, understand, and reflect on an enlightening project, “Forgotten Souls of Tory Row: Remembering the Enslaved People of Brattle Street.”

Artists Kayla Myers and TECHNI Energize Art-Making for Zone 3 Community Sketchbook

Early in the afternoon of art activities for Zone 3 Community Sketchbook on July 16 in Allston, I photographed people of all ages engaged in adding to the very long stretch of inviting open wall. Two days later I came by again. Awed by the art that had been accomplished in one weekend, I couldn’t wait to share the impressive results. Here are selected photos, links, quotes, and notes to convey how this new phase of creativity in Zone 3 came to be.

ART SCRIM Extends Possibilities for Public Art Outdoors, as shown by Yenny Hernandez, Anna Dugan and Deborah Johnson

Each of these three artists has created several fabric panels that transform stretches of metal construction fencing near the intersection of Harvard Street and Western Avenue in Allston. One, Anna Dugan, incorporated concrete Jersey barriers as well. All three worked out their own distinctive series of panels printed on scrim, a lightweight durable translucent textile that has long been used in theater sets. Daylight, street light, clouds, the sky itself, and any machinery or equipment behind the fence can add variables to our view. Whether driving by or standing near, we respond to these shifting features. I grew more aware of such changes as I photographed the art. In fact, I felt that each artist had recognized and successfully addressed the possibilities of scrim.