Category humor

Recent Art Combines with Earlier Creative Features on the Bikeway in Somerville

On an April walk along Somerville Community Path (or Bikeway), I stopped to enjoy some new discoveries and familiar favorites. In this post I begin with photos of the recent additions and then share older photos, plus links to supporting information in earlier posts or new resources. As always, I appreciate the reliable richness and intriguing changes on this path.

Art Raises Many Related Questions in Amazing Ways on the Boston Common: “What Do We Have in Common?” by Janet Zweig, now through October 24

Presented by NOW+THERE and Friends of the Public Garden, through wonderfully welcoming, attentive, versatile Guides.
I’ll post very quickly in case anyone who lives nearby can visit the Boston Common before this brief opportunity ends. I plan to return and post with more connections. Meanwhile here are a few photos from my first visit two days ago, with quotes from two informative rich resources: NOW+THERE and Friends of the Public Garden.

Wonders of Children’s Books Wait within the Solomon Gate, Designed by Höweler + Yoon Architecture

If you enter Harvard Yard from Quincy Street near its intersection with Massachusetts Avenue, watch for the rushing rabbit, grinning cat, top hat, and other small images in the tall black ironwork of the gate completed in December 2020. These might entice you to stop and look for more connections to “Alice in Wonderland” or to a world of children’s books.

Artists Myoung Ho Lee and B. Wurtz both Focus on Single Trees at deCordova Sculpture Park

Artists Myoung Ho Lee and B. Wurtz both focus carefully on single trees in these two samples from larger projects that reflect their own unique creative processes. Their artworks thrive on the trees and sky through seasonal or daily changes of their current settings in deCordova Sculpture Park. My iPhone photos here hint at those, while quotes give basic background. Links (in red) to intriguing resources reveal fascinating features of both artists’ approaches and results.

Panels from Significant Summer 2020 Extend Mystic River Mural and Affirm Hopes

In my July post about the Mystic River Mural Project, I was hopeful but not sure that the Summer 2020 project would work through all the complications of the pandemic. Now I can gladly share glimpses of the inspiring outcome with photos of the 2020 panels added this fall on Mystic Avenue. For context, read quotes with links to informative sources. Also note a new video that adds an enriching overview of the whole project.

Chris Frost Builds Two New Birdhouses for the Bikeway in Arlington before Taking Colony Down

After more than two years of winning devoted fans and welcoming many special guests, “Colony” created by Christopher and Basil Frost is due to depart before October ends. When I visited for an emotional last look, I was glad to find that two new birdhouses nearby were ready for first looks, both full of their own appeal and promise.

Colorful Characters Brighten Brine Tanks: Mural by Monique Aimee in Cambridge

Selected and funded by Percent-for-Art program in Cambridge, Monique Aimee proposed, planned, and painted her mural on all sides of the four tall brine tanks along the lot for Saint Peter’s Field. She began near the end of June and finished near the end of August. My photos here come from a few visits there throughout the summer. The links should take you to videos and exciting photos of the work in progress on Monique Aimee’s Instagram site: https://www.instagram.com/moniqueaimee/ The quotes here should give background that lets you visit in person or online.

Animal Sculptures by Judy McKie and Jay Coogan Prove Patient, Purposeful and Playful

Judy McKie’s bronze cat benches and Jay Coogan’s aluminum dogs and cats were kept off location during extensive construction of Cambridge Public school and library properties where they had become favorite features. Soon after they returned ready to resume their roles, the closing of all schools and libraries in March 2020 cut short the opportunities for children and adults to interact with them again. Though I had found opportunities to admire and photograph these artful animals, I didn’t want to share the images until the sculptures could be part of daily life once more.

John Tagiuri’s Art Can Open Doors in Surprising Ways

The two giant paintbrush “door pulls” created by John Tagiuri for Maud Morgan Visual Arts in 2009 when the center first opened now must wait for a post-lockdown reopening, whenever that will be. Meanwhile my attention to these and other artworks outside the center pulled me into John Tagiuri’s website, which is rich in samples of his other projects, all displaying unique combinations of strong concepts with playful twists. From those, I located the towering endless-column lamps over the basketball court in Sennott Park, at Broadway, Cambridge.

Birdwatching Merges with Watching Art on Somerville Community Path

Walking Somerville Community Path from Willow Ave toward Grove Street (near Davis Square), watch for hints of nesting in Christopher Frost’ s “Annex” and note the wide-spread wings of the newly landed Raven in “a Free Range Sculpture Garden.”