Category history

Look Up at Significant Symbols in Concord for the Umbrella ARTFEST

The two photos above are from installations I had hoped to include in my quick post about ARTFEST a week earlier. Both installations interact with varying light, air currents above, and beings below. In this promised swift sequel I try to offer photos, quotes, and links that will lead you closer to those experiences online or in person.

Connect to Concord with “Change is in the Air: Art Walk” through May

Following the map for Umbrella Artfest Earth Day Art Walk has greatly added to my own awareness of Concord as well as the artists who created installations for the six stops listed. Because Art Walk has been up for a week with just a few more ahead, I’ll post quickly now. I want to spread the word so people who live close enough can go before it’s gone. Then I’ll hope to post a more comprehensive sequel later in May, including one key installation* I didn’t get to visit yet.

View a Few of Many, Many Murals by Marka27, “Prolific Artisan”

In recent years I have seen, admired, and taken photos of several murals signed by Marka27, but finally I feel prepared to post with a focus on Victor “Marka27” Quiñonez. In this post I can offer photos of a few of his Boston-area murals, along with quotes and links that should lead you to lots more by this “Prolific Artisan.”

Metal Preserves and Transforms Features of Trees in Art by Ed Shay and Letha Wilson

Ed Shay’s ten-foot-tall bronze “Acadian Gyro” entered deCordova Sculpture park about three decades ago. Letha Wilson’s nearly as tall cor-ten steel sculpture “Hawaii California Steel(Figure/Ground)” came in about two years ago. Until now I hadn’t  considered their common key elements: 1) attention to the forms of leaves and branches, 2) expressive rendering of those forms in durable metals ( bronze and steel) 3)relation to the seasonally changing foliage of nearby trees. My awareness grew from posting about four more obviously tree-related artworks in the park and noting further connections. Though I have been a volunteer guide in the park for almost two decades, this focus led me deeper into resources with heightened reasons to share them.

Wonders of Children’s Books Wait within the Solomon Gate, Designed by Höweler + Yoon Architecture

If you enter Harvard Yard from Quincy Street near its intersection with Massachusetts Avenue, watch for the rushing rabbit, grinning cat, top hat, and other small images in the tall black ironwork of the gate completed in December 2020. These might entice you to stop and look for more connections to “Alice in Wonderland” or to a world of children’s books.

African Masks Generated Art in Restored Sculptures by Vusumuzi Maduna

In the early 1980’s artist Vusumuzi Maduna created two monumental sculptures inspired by African masks; “Inner City Totem I” outside the Cambridge Community Center and “Inner City Totem II” outside Margaret Fuller House. Sadly stressed by decades of New England seasons, both were recently restored in ways that should help them stand through countless decades ahead. Here are photos from my visits to each site this month with quotes from key resources about the art, artist, and restoration.

Winter Weather Combines with Outdoor Art: Monique Aimee’s Brine Tanks Mural, James Tyler’s Ten Figures

Photos from recent winter visits add perspective and updates to earlier posts in other seasons.

Art Grows from Trees: Alan Sonfist and Richard Rosenblum at deCordova

Sonfist’s The Endangered Species of New England has been part of the Sculpture Park since 2013. Rosenblum’s Venusvine, created 1990, has been there since 1996. Both artworks reflect their artists’ deeply rooted work with trees. Both are metal renderings of natural forms. Both artworks have decisive locations in the park. They’ve held their ground while other artworks have moved around, left or entered in recent years.

Louise Nevelson and Ruth Bader Ginsburg Briefly Share Space and Spirit

Since 1985, Louise Nevelson’s painted steel sculpture, Night Wall 1, has stood 12 feet tall on a lawn edged by several Harvard University buildings, including the law school library ( Langdell Hall). Last week for the first time I found a way to post about this admired art and artist, though I had meant to many times for many years. At the start of the Jewish New Year, 5781, Louise Nevelson’s monumental sculpture kept a steady silent vigil in view of a steadily growing memorial for Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Respond to the Spirit of Art Ramble around Fairyland Pond in Concord

My goal now is to get the word out about a wonderful way to get away, though this temporary exhibit in Concord’s Hapgood Wright Town Forest won’t let you get away from the issues of climate change. I went once last week and hope to return as often as possible before the last day, November 8. I hope to post again with more photos and reflections on water, but here are quotes and links to lead you into the forest, around the pond, with art and poetry.